Date Caramel

This healthy sugar-free caramel is a must in every healthy home.

  • It’s simple

  • Quick (made in 5 minutes)

  • Healthy

  • Makes a perfect sweetener for breakfast, snacks, smoothies etc.

Some date caramels require cooking to “caramelise” the mixture, but this recipe is as simple as peeling a banana.

All you need is a decent food processor or blender and an air-tight container or jar.

It will keep for about a week in the fridge but you can make several batches and store for months in your freezer.

How to use date caramel

Date caramel is an essential part of a sugar-free diet. Dates are powerful healthy sweeteners and this easy caramel can be added to anything for extra sweetness.

Health benefits of dates:

Date caramel is made with Medjool dates, also known as the diamond of dates. They are easily digested and an excellent source of fibre. Dates are also rich in B vitamins, copper, potassium, manganese, magnesium, iron, phosphorus, zinc, and selenium. Although fairly high in glucose or fructose, dates contain a special kind of soluble fibre called beta-D-glucan which helps control blood sugar. In addition, they are high in antioxidant and anti-cancer compounds.

 

Total time:

5 minutes

Makes:

1 Medium jar

Ingredients:

  • 20 Medjool dates, pitted

  • 250 ml canned coconut milk (see note)

Directions:

Simply blend both ingredients on high speed in your food processor or blender until creamy.

A few notes:

Coconut milk:

I usually add the coconut milk gradually until I get the desired consistency. Some canned coconut milk is totally liquid which works best in this recipe. If your coconut milk has a thick solid part on top and an almost transparent layer below, start by blending the whole thing first and then add it gradually to the dates.

Medjool dates:

it’s important to use Medjool dates for this recipe because these are the softest, stickiest, and tastiest. If they’re dry and hard, soak them in warm water first for about 20 minutes

Did you know…

Dates are considered the oldest cultivated fruit in the world (!), grown for about 6,000 years in the Middle East?